Mark Friedberg Discusses Sequel’s Production Design

July 28, 2013

Production designer Mark Friedberg revealed some interesting details regarding THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2. In this interview, he discusses some possible easter eggs, the setting, the villain’s origins, and costume designs. Check it out below.

ELECTRO:

He [Electro] was an interesting character. I think, in general, even though there’s so much digital going on, we try to make everything as practically as we can. So his costume is also born of an Oscorp issue, that the costume has to do with the fact that the people working on him had to deal with an electrical thing, so it’s supposed to be a vulcanised rubber. We didn’t want him to look as though he’d gone to the superhero costume shop, which is sometimes what it looks like. We tried to have it have a story as well as look cool and strong.

RHINO:

Rhino is Alexei, a Soviet. And I think one of the ideas was to contrast the futuristic titanium or polycarbonate materials of some of the other Oscorp technology, and the fact that a lot of these costumes are involved with your body – the systems of your body. I’m not just putting on armour, it’s part of my body. Rhino is kind of a throwback character, in a way, almost a period character, which isn’t meant to be a knock on Russia, but rather quoting the sort of bulky, massiveness of the Soviet Union.

SPIDER-MAN’S NEW SUIT:

Yes, it is. It’s a little more like the ones in the earlier films. He has the ability to wear headphones, and he has a little more tack in his wrists than he used to have. He can do a little bit more. The funny thing is he always ends up in his garage, tinkering. He’s a science student.

THE FILM’S SETTING:

The story is mostly set in spring and summer, so we were on stage a lot through the winter, but now we’re in the nice weather, we’re outdoors on the weekends. Then there are two more stage parts of this to go. About three weeks.

EASTER EGGS:

As a designer, I steal regularly – that’s what we’re paid to do. Marc [Webb] knows a great deal about it. He had a background in it before he even did the first movie. His version of the Spider-Man world is something he invented, so there are key places and key elements along the way. Sometimes they’re quotes – times on a clock can refer to a number on a comic book.

 

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